Forum Comments

Nutrition Software and Fitness Trackers
In Food
Hayley
Apr 02, 2022
I did a quick search on the forum with Oura ring and when I couldn't find anything I typed in "tracker" and found this post. I can't quite tell if it's a new thread or I'm hijacking someone's journal so just in case I will issue an apologetic disclaimer. 😬 I haven't tracked anything in years. My apple watch was a pain and I had (have?) a really old FitBit that drove me nuts. I used Polar HRM prior to that and eventually put them all aside because I was so obsessed with the numbers. Before knee surgery I was still using my OTF arm band to monitor where my HR was during intervals but I never cared about calorie burn. Since knee surgery I haven't done cardio in almost 2 months. Well, up until last weekend when the PT approved me to do intervals on the bike and I spent a day last weekend testing it out. I'm happy to say I'm loving the results of just strength training - not just feeling (looking?) stronger but mostly the lack of ravenous hunger and exhausting fatigue I felt after running and tons of cardio. With all of that being said, I have a birthday coming up and was toying with the idea of getting a Whoop band or an Oura ring. I don't really care about calorie burn from my workout or even daily steps. I'm interested more in sleep, HRV, and all of that sort of fun data. So I'm trying to decide which, if any, tracker would be worth getting. It might be that I simply don't need anything and that's ok. There are so many gadgets out there these days that I kind of don't know where to start. I know there have been plenty of conversations around this before and I'll probably toodle around the website after I post this but thought I'd ask anyway. :)
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Pregnancy and weight
In Mindset
Hayley
Mar 25, 2022
Thank you for tagging me, @skwigg! I'm not sure how much help I will be but I'll do my best. Firstly, congratulations Letizia on both the marriage and the pregnancy! Both are very exciting. I think I still follow you on IG so I've seen many of your lovely photos. Skwigg's comment about noticing new, intrusive, and obsessive thoughts and stepping back from them are definitely key. I don't know that I can offer up any specific action steps to take but I will throw in my 2 cents from personal experience in hopes that whatever resonates will help. My first pregnancy with my daughter was a slippery slope into bulimia. Thank goodness she was born (and still is healthy) but I gained very little weight and wasn't told this was an issue by any doctor until the end of the pregnancy (despite me asking if it was acceptable throughout). This doesn't necessarily pertain to pregnancy, perhaps, but I will say that after I had both of my kids I was desperate to return to exercising. I didn't have weight to lose with either of them (I may have perceived that differently back then) but I still yearned to run, teach, etc. I was so focused on the exercise component that I can honestly (and very sadly) say that I missed out on a lot. Because I jumped back into high intensity stuff too quickly I think it messed with my milk production. I had serious issues breast feeding Chloe because she was born 3 weeks early and a little small so it was hard. I worked diligently with a lactation consultant but gave up because I was absolutely exhausted. My son, however, was an eating machine. I had no issues nursing him, but again, it was time consuming and my thoughts were often elsewhere. Going places, doing things, seeing people, exercising, etc. All in all I nursed him for about 3 months before I switched to bottle and formula feeding there, too (I did pump for a while but again, exhausting and time consuming). There is absolutely nothing wrong with formula feeding and my youngest, now 8 years old, is healthy as a horse. What I am sad about is that bonding experience you get from nursing your child, those precious moments when it's just the two of you (unless you're nursing in public, which is totally doable just a little more complicated 😁) that I will never get back. Don't get me wrong - I still spent a lot of time with both of my kids. We went to parks, on walks (and jogs), met up with friends, etc, but I know I spent a lot of time thinking about my body and gaining back both my pre-pregnancy figure, stamina, and endurance. If I could go back in time I would do many things differently. I would lie in bed nursing my baby more. I would take gentle walks and put fitness on the back burner. I would still make an effort to go to parks and be with people because having babies can sometimes feel very lonely and isolating, but I definitely would've spent more time being kind with myself and realizing that the most important thing was lapping up every moment of their newness. I did do that quite a bit, to a certain extent (and many days were exhausting and very hard) but I try to think about the learning opportunities I take from those days and apply them to the here and now. I apologize for that lengthy comment and if it's completely unhelpful. I can only offer up hindsights that, to do this day, are applicable. Having knee surgery and being incapacitated (for the most part) for 4-6 weeks has completely flipped my perspective on all of this. Nourish your body (and your baby). Eat a variety of foods for various nutrients. Understand that all of this with your body - the strangeness in how you walk, move, feel, sleep, etc - it's all temporary. I always said I hated being pregnant because it felt so cumbersome. But honestly it was just different and I think I was less open to changing my perspective. I'll be interested in reading what Sheena and sunshine can offer and hope that what I wrote was ok. It's hard to tap out these words without getting pretty emotional because again, I can't get those days back, but I love my two more than anything else in this world and hope that the rest of your pregnancy goes smoothly!
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Trashy TV/ Addictive TV
In Fun
Exercise for Weight Loss?
In Fitness
Hayley
Mar 31, 2021
I know it's only a start but today I opted to walk instead of run or do any other structured cardio. I taught the last 4 mornings so I know my body was ready for a rest and I'm glad I listened to it. It wasn't like I did a brisk walk even because I was with a friend and our dog and he likes to stop, smell, and pee on every blade of grass. There are still moments when I know (like this afternoon) when I may want to be active, but I'm focusing on the ideas that running on hamster wheel is only going to increase my appetite and I really want to try and even out the hunger and cravings. I know I keep mentioning Jade Teta, but he talks a lot about HEC (hormones, energy, and cravings) and if the way in which you're eating and exercising is throwing HEC out of check then something isn't working. I have to agree that lifting super heavy or slinging weights around in a gym stimulates my appetite. I really don't love weight lifting right now so, as I mentioned before, most of my strength work comes from specific Jazzercise formats that incorporate weights. My abs, arms, and legs still get sore from time to time so I feel like I'm doing something, but I just can't fathom going back and doing 3-5 sets of one exercise of anything. Anyway, I'm happy this thread has been rejuvenated and I hope to keep reminding myself that structured/formal exercise usually does more harm than good. I'm enjoying walking on the days that I'm not teaching - I'm catching up with some great podcasts and audiobooks.
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Exercise for Weight Loss?
In Fitness
Hayley
Mar 26, 2021
Thank you for bumping this! I'm going to copy and paste what I wrote in your journal: I am 100% on board with the idea that exercising increases hunger, throws hormones out of whack, induces cravings, and overall messes with your body (and mind) in really bogus ways. Even though I logically know this I still can't freaking stop the train wreck I hope on every. single. day. For 2 weeks I maintained my Jazzercise teaching schedule 2-4x a week and only walked Koda on the days I didn't teach. I'd be lying if I said I wasn't itching to run when I saw others jog by, but for 2 weeks I kept at it. I can't say I noticed any difference in hunger, cravings or fatigue (nor did I expect to because, hello - 2 weeks) and before I know it I was back on the cardio wagon. I truly believe your body adapts to whatever you put it through (tons of cardio? Ok...you need to do that PLUS more to maintain weight AND you're pissing me off so I'm going to make you feed me more and throw hormones out of whack) and yet, as I said, I can't stop. Perhaps this was a better post for the "Exercise for weight loss" thread but I got a little carried away. :-D I actually love Jade Teta and he recently did an awesome IG post on this same subject. I'm also going to copy and paste something Jade Teta made on IG the other day. Perhaps not everyone agrees with his ideas, but I personally think he's very knowledgeable and since this falls under that topic here you go: "I am going to tell you something about exercise you aren’t going to believe and yet research is absolutely clear on. Exercise does not add calories to your TDEE expenditure the way you think it does. If you burn 2000 calories at rest and then burn 300 calories in a workout, you wrongly think you burned 2300 calories. You also might think that if you worked out intensely with weights you’ll get a substantial after-burn effect for several hours or days. In fact, we are starting to learn your metabolism does not exactly work this way. It does not work in an additive fashion, but rather constrains energy use in the days and weeks that follow. In other words, it’s more like a rubber band. When you exercise you burn some calories and stretch out the rubber band. If you exercise intensely and get some after-burn you stretch it out a lot. But like any rubber band it recoils back. In the case of the metabolism, it shrinks back even more than it was before. So you think you burned 2300 calories or more. In reality, you burned much less and TDEE did not change much. See other slides for a graphical representation taken from the work of @hpontzer PHD author of the book BURN where he highlights much of his research in this area. Also, exercise makes many people hungry. In one study on menopausal women I often use, 60minutes of jogging 5 times per week resulted in no weight loss in 50% of the women. 25% of those women actually gained weight. The other 25% did lose a small amount of weight. That’s a lot of activity for a 75% failure rate. And imagine doing all of that work and gaining weight? That’s because we misunderstand how exercise works. Does this mean don’t exercise? Of course not. It’s exceedingly healthy, it just won’t do a damn thing for most people trying to lose weight. Think of diet as the weight loss part of the equation and exercise as a means to maintain lean body mass. This is why weight training may be the best bet for weight loss. It MAY have less negative impact on appetite and it helps shuttle extra calories into lean mass development."
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Hayley
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