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Who Am I Without Dieting?
In Mindset
Mottainai
Feb 26, 2020
I still have an interest in exercise and health as well, but I have also seen that it can change from something negative to something that’s only positive. I actually feel a very strong life fulfillment, purpose, something like that? in things related to using our bodies to enjoy movement, touch, physical pleasures, improving abilities, keeping in good health, etc. Somehow I’m able to follow that now only in ways that are life and happiness enhancing, rather than stressful or painful, and with a good dose of hedonism and fun as opposed to being all control and denial. I don’t feel like I have a huge supply of things to keep myself interested occupied. and I think that’s one of the reasons I turned to dieting and fitness obsession as a teen in the first place, but I find a way to fill the time. I read a book every day or two, both fiction and non-fiction psychology, religion, pop science, self-help types. I enjoy online tv series and whenever I have a break from work where I have enough time to sit and watch (like this month) I go on a binge-watching streak. I like continuing my language and translation studies to progress in my work, and I get into learning other languages occasionally too. I was just reminded by Skwigg’s comment that accidentally bought an insanely expensive year subscription to Duolingo so I should be using that more actually. I have a few podcasts I really enjoy listening to while I go for walks outside (Terrible, Thanks for Asking is my recent binge-listen). As much as I complain about my kids being stress and work I do enjoy the constant busyness and especially taking them outside to play in nature. Now that I’m free from food weirdness I genuinely love food and eating, as does my husband, so a lot of our everyday free time and money is spent cooking and eating together, learning recipes and shopping, finding and going to restaurants, and so on. I also recently bought several field guides to birds and plants/trees so I can try to identify local nature around, since that was something my mom has always been into and I’d like to pass that onto my kids too. In my future, when the kids are big enough to not destroy things and/or are out of the house more often, I love puzzles so I want to start doing more of those for fun, and I also hope we can get into doing more recreational sports and hiking again. Something to look forward to. I started that by saying I didn’t have many things to keep me interested, but I ended up with quite a list!
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How I Think About Meal Plans - Plus, What Are Your Fallback Meals?
In Food
Mottainai
Jan 20, 2020
Pasta and rice are our main go-to meals. We always have a variety of dried pasta and (this being Asia) cook rice once or twice a day so that’s always ready and waiting. I always have the fridge stocked with a bunch of assorted vegetables and meat/fish in the freezer. So whenever there’s no plan, we usually either make some sort of oil/cream/tomato pasta sauce with a random variation of vegetables/meat, or a variation on some sort of boiled/stir-fried/deep fried Japanese dish to go with rice. Or fried rice or curry/stew on rice made with packaged roux, that happens a lot too. I’ve become incredibly spontaneous with my cooking so I also tend to just stock up on ingredients and cook on a whim, unless someone wants something specific and then I’ll just make a quick trip to the store. We have a lot of grocery stores nearby and I’m always out and about anyway so I just buy food for the day spontaneously often too. I always wrap and keep even just tiny bits and bites of whatever is leftover from dishes that I reheat and put together for mish-mashed lunches for myself. To be honest we also eat out/order in takeout pizza or sushi or ramen or whatever several meals a week too, just because cooking and cleaning up three times a day while looking after small kids is a lot of work. And because it’ll be too expensive once they eat proper quantities of food, lol. In short, my brain cannot compute the idea of a meal plan anymore. I know it’s my past talking, but I still feel slightly allergic to anything that resembles a diet plan. I do remember a time when it used to feel only safe to eat the same foods and the same meals, but that just doesn’t fit into my lifestyle or my family’s lifestyle anymore. Too stressful, deciding and eating on a whim feels so much easier, and as long as I shop for discount produce it’s not a budget issue either.
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Regular Structure vs Intuitive Freedom
In Food
Mottainai
Jan 11, 2020
My experience with breakfast mirrors everyone else’s comments. I skipped it for a long time, felt like I didn’t need it and actually had more energy not eating it. But over time I came to realize that eating more in the morning led to more stable moods and more stable appetite the rest of the day, and for the first time I started not getting that insatiable snacky hunger at the end of the day. I used to only be able to workout on an empty stomach, no matter how long that meant waiting to eat, but at some point I now feel ready to run around at any time of day and feel that eating breakfast and lunch does give me better, true energy to use. I don’t recall paying enough attention to when the switch happened, although it was probably during a period after my most recent baby when I was pretty tired all day anyway and exercise wasn’t even on my radar, lol. Maybe it just takes some time to adjust to new patterns? As for planning vs. spontaneity, personally I find that a structure like “three meals (not snacks) a day, most days” is enough flexibility that it’s ridiculously easy to stick to without any effort (given that societal norms and schedules are generally based on the 3-a-day structure) and I can still vary what, when, and how much I eat, but it’s enough structure and routine that my eating and hunger don’t end up getting off-balance. Keep experimenting to find what feels most right and healthiest, and your body will probably both adapt and guide you at the same time.
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Mottainai
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